Gluten-Free Sourdough Pizza Crust

This gluten-free sourdough pizza crust can be made thin or thick, it is vegan and freezer-friendly! You will need a gluten-free sourdough starter (you can use discard) to make this flavorful sourdough pizza crust. To make a pizza without a sourdough starter, check out my no-yeast cassava flour pizza crust!

Gluten-free sourdough pizza with a tomato, garlic, mushrooms, and a knife on a white surface.

Why You Will Love This Recipe

Customizable. Make the crust thin or thick!

Make-ahead. You can pre-mix the dough 1-2 days ahead or even freeze it!

Flavor. The best gluten-free pizza crust I’ve had so far!

Easy to handle. The dough can be easily rolled out or shaped by hand.

Sourdough Starter

Sourdough starter is wild yeast that people used to bake bread before the invention of commercial yeast. I also make gluten-free sourdough bread with my starter and love it! If you don’t have a sourdough starter yet, you can make one from gluten-free flour and water. It will take 1-2 weeks for the starter to become active and fit for gluten-free sourdough recipes! All you need to do is follow a few simple steps. It is easier than you think! If you would like to make pizza crust without sourdough, check out my no-yeast cassava flour pizza crust.

Ingredients

Ingredients on a wooden surface with labels.

Water – use room temperature water to activate the sourdough starter well.

Salt – sea salt has a good nutritional profile.

Flour – you can also use a pre-made blend if you have to but the flavor won’t be the same.

Psyllium husk – make sure it is whole husks and not powder.

Substitutions

Brown rice flour – you can use oat flour, white rice flour, sorghum flour, buckwheat flour, or other types if you need to. Keep in mind that some flours absorb liquids better than others, so you might need to adjust the amount based on the texture.

Cornstarch – I am using cornstarch to make this pizza nightshade free (potato free) but you can use potato starch, tapioca starch, or arrowroot starch instead.

Psyllium husk – I do not recommend substituting psyllium husk. If you substitute psyllium husk, your crust will be less stable and more crumbly. Psyllium husk is by far the best binding agent for gluten-free sourdough pizza! Xanthan gum, guargum, or other options are just not good enough.

Equipment

A digital scale – this is the one tool that will make your GF baking enjoyable! What could be better than a recipe that turns out perfectly every time?

Parchment paper.

A large mixing bowl.

– Baking tray – I use a cast iron skillet but a pizza stone or a simple baking sheet will work, too!

Rolling pin (optional)

Step-by-Step Instructions

Step 1 – Mix the dough

Psyllium husk mixed with water in a glass bowl with a whisk in it.

First, add psyllium husk to the room-temperature water, whisk to combine, and set aside for 5 minutes. Psyllium husk will absorb the liquids and form into a gel.

Psyllium husk and sourdough starter in a mixing bowl with a whisk.

After five minutes, add the sourdough starter (fed or unfed) to a mixing bowl and pour psyllium husk gel into it. Mix to combine.

Mixing the dough by hand in the mixing bowl.

Add all the dry ingredients to the mixing bowl and mix with your hands.

The dough formed into a ball inside the mixing bowl.

Cover with a kitchen towel or plastic wrap and leave the dough to ferment and rise for 3-6 hours at room temperature or longer in the refrigerator (anywhere from overnight up to 2 days).

Step 2 – Shape and par-bake

Preheat the oven to 400F/200C together with the baking tray you are using. I like to use my cast iron skillet to bake pizza crust! You can use a pizza stone or a simple baking sheet.

Separating the dough ball into two parts with a bench scraper.

Then, transfer the dough onto a piece of parchment paper and divide it into two parts if making two medium-size pizzas or use the whole dough for a large pizza.

Rolled out dough on parchment paper with a rolling pin on it.

Pour a little bit of oil onto the dough to prevent sticking. Now, roll the dough out or shape it with your hands. For a thinner pizza roll the dough out thin, for a fluffier thicker crust roll the dough less.

Sourdough pizza crust shaped into a circle on parchment paper.

Then, form the borders of the pizza and create a nice round shape.

Shaped pizza crust in the cast iron skillet with parchment paper.

Transfer the dough together with the parchment paper onto the baking tray (in my case, it is a cast-iron skillet) and bake the crust without toppings for 15 minutes (20 minutes for a crunchy crust). This step is called par-baking meaning you pre-bake the dough before the toppings go on it.

Step 3 – Add toppings and bake again

Then, add the toppings of choice and return to the oven for another 10 minutes. When ready, slice the pizza and enjoy! Top with fresh greens for extra flavor.

Gluten-free sourdough pizza baked with a slice cut out.

Favorite Pizza Sauces & Toppings

– Basic tomato pizza sauce with mushrooms, tomatoes, fresh basil, and cheddar.

– Olive oil & minced garlic base with olives, feta cheese, red onion, mushrooms, and arugula.

– Tomato pizza base with bolognese sauce.

Proofing Explained

In sourdough bread, there are two stages of bread fermentation – the bulk rise and proofing. With sourdough pizza crust, we only do one stage which includes both in one. Proofing is the fermentation & rising process of GF pizza dough before baking. For a more sour pizza you will need to proof your dough in the refrigerator for 12-16 hours, where for a less sour crust it will only need 3-6 hours in room temperature. You can even leave the dough in the refrigerator for up to 2 days if you need to make the recipe ahead or if you want to make a few pizzas at different times during the weekend.

Expert Tips

Weigh your ingredients. I myself was hesitant to use grams in place of cups, but once I learned how to, I started preferring a digital scale to cups! It is so much easier and time-saving. I still use cups for liquids, oats, sugar, and some other things but GF flour has to be weighed for recipes to turn out well!

– For a better rise use a mature sourdough starter (the one that was fed and is now risen to its full capacity).

– If you don’t want to wait for the pizza dough to ferment you can use it in 5-10 minutes after mixing the ingredients. Keep in mind that the crust won’t be sour and it won’t have as much rise.

– You can use a pre-made gluten-free flour blend instead of the flours listed in the recipe, just keep in mind that the dough might behave differently and have a different flavor. Use 240g of GF flour for the recipe. I have a great homemade gluten-free flour blend you can try.

Keep a bottle with filtered room-temperature water on the kitchen counter to use in sourdough recipes. I know how inconvenient it can be to not have room-temperature water when you need it!

FAQ

Can I Freeze The Dough?

Yes, wrap the dough in plastic wrap and freeze it for up to 3 months. You can freeze the dough before or after fermentation, although it is better to freeze it after. If you freeze your dough before fermentation, you will not get as much rise after thawing as bacteria will be weak.

Can You Make Individual Size Pizzas With This Recipe?

Yes! Split the dough into as many parts as you need to make small-sized individual pizzas.

Can You Make This Recipe Without Sourdough Starter?

You can make my no-yeast cassava flour pizza instead as this recipe is specifically designed to work with a GF sourdough starter.

Why Prebake The Crust?

You need to par-bake the crust in order for it to bake all the way through. If you bake the dough with toppings it will be wet and gummy on the bottom.

Did you like this gluten-free sourdough pizza crust recipe? Please, leave a 5-star 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟  rating in the recipe card below! And if you REALLY liked this recipe, consider supporting it by buying me a coffee! 🙂 Thank you and have a great day!

Gluten-free sourdough pizza with a piece cut out.

Gluten Free Sourdough Pizza Dough

Natasha
This is the best gluten-free sourdough pizza crust recipe because it is not only easy to handle but it is also full of flavor and easy to customize!
5 from 5 votes
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 50 mins
Total Time 1 hr 5 mins
Course Main Course, pizza
Cuisine European
Servings 2 medium pizza crusts
Calories 302 kcal

Equipment

Ingredients
  

  • 15 g (2½ tbsp) psyllium husk not powder
  • 300 g (1⅓ cups) water room-temperature
  • 150 g (1 cup + 2 tbsp) gluten-free sourdough starter fed is better but discard is good, too
  • 170 g (1⅓ cups) brown rice flour oat, sorghum, and other flours can be used, too
  • 70 g (½ cup) cornstarch potato, tapioca, arrowroot starches work, too
  • 12 g (1¾ tsp) salt
  • oil for rolling the dough to prevent sticking

Instructions
 

  • First, add psyllium husk to the room-temperature water, whisk to combine, and set aside for 5 minutes. Psyllium husk will absorb the liquids and form into a gel.
  • After five minutes, add the sourdough starter (fed or unfed) to a mixing bowl and pour psyllium husk gel into it. Mix to combine.
  • Add all the dry ingredients to the mixing bowl and mix with your hands.
  • Cover with a kitchen towel or plastic wrap and leave the dough to ferment and rise for 3-6 hours at room temperature or longer in the refrigerator (anywhere from overnight up to 2 days).
  • Preheat the oven to 400F/200C together with the baking tray you are using. I like to use my cast iron skillet to bake pizza crust! You can use a pizza stone or a simple baking sheet.
  • Then, transfer the dough onto a piece of parchment paper and divide it into two parts if making two medium-size pizzas or use the whole dough for a large pizza.
  • Pour a little bit of oil onto the dough to prevent sticking. Now, roll the dough out or shape it with your hands. For a thinner pizza roll the dough out thin, for a fluffier thicker crust roll the dough less.
  • Then, form the borders of the pizza and create a nice round shape.
  • Transfer the dough together with the parchment paper onto the baking tray (in my case, it is a cast-iron skillet) and bake the crust without toppings for 15 minutes (20 minutes for a crunchy crust). This step is called par-baking meaning you pre-bake the dough before the toppings go on it.
  • Then, add the toppings of choice and return to the oven for another 10 minutes. When ready, slice the pizza and enjoy! Top with fresh greens for extra flavor.

Notes

Weigh your ingredients. I myself was hesitant to use grams in place of cups, but once I learned how to, I started preferring a digital scale to cups! It is so much easier and time-saving. I still use cups for liquids, oats, sugar, and some other things but GF flour has to be weighed for recipes to turn out well!
– For a better rise use a mature sourdough starter (the one that was fed and is now risen to its full capacity).
– If you don’t want to wait for the pizza dough to ferment you can use it in 5-10 minutes after mixing the ingredients. Keep in mind that the crust won’t be sour and it won’t have as much rise.
– You can use a pre-made gluten-free flour blend instead of the flours listed in the recipe. Use 240g of GF flour for the recipe.
Keep a bottle with filtered room-temperature water on the kitchen counter to use in sourdough recipes. I know how inconvenient it can be to not have room-temperature water when you need it!

Nutrition

Serving: 0.5pizzaCalories: 302kcalCarbohydrates: 67.3gProtein: 4.6gFat: 1.8gSaturated Fat: 0.4gSodium: 1180mgPotassium: 183mgFiber: 6gSugar: 0.5gCalcium: 10mgIron: 1mg
Keyword GF sourdough discard pizza dough, gluten-free pizza crust, Gluten-free sourdough pizza crust
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

3 thoughts on “Gluten-Free Sourdough Pizza Crust”

  1. 5 stars
    The best (GF) pizza crusts I’ve ever made! An extra un-topped crust made good flatbread too. Thank you for sharing this recipe!

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